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Quick Sourdough Bread 

Quick Sourdough Bread

When it comes to baking sourdough bread, I’ve experimented with countless techniques and timings over the years. However, I recently stumbled upon a method that completely revolutionized my approach: using 50% sourdough starter in the dough. Honestly, I feel like I wasted so much time not trying this sooner. The difference is astounding! No autolyse, and the fermentation process speeds up dramatically, taking just about 3.5 to 4 hours, and the resulting bread is nothing short of delicious. Also all mixing can be done by hand.

If you’re looking for a way to streamline your sourdough baking and still achieve incredible flavor and texture, this method is a game-changer.

Ingredients

Sourdough Starter 

Dough

Directions 

Starter 

  • 7 am add starter to the water and whisk together, add flour, mix well, cover loosely, let it sit at 30C/86F for about 4 hours until starter reaches its peak (at least triples in volume).
  • Learn how to make starter from scratch here.

Note: for starter’s refreshments follow your regular proportions 

Dough

  • 11 am mix water with sourdough starter, add salt and all flour mix well until all flour will become hydrated, but the dough will be sticky and lumpy. Cover, let rest at 24-26C/75-79F for 30 min.
  • 11:30 am 1st stretch and fold( the dough will become more obedient, try to round it) let ferment at 24-26C/75-79F for 45 min.
  • 12:15 pm 2nd stretch and fold, cover the dough , let ferment at 24-26C/75-79F for 45 min.
  • 1 pm 3rd stretch and fold, cover, let ferment at 24-26C/75-79F for 45 min.
  • 1:45 pm 4th stretch and fold, cover the dough, let ferment at 24-26C/75-79F for 45 min.
  • Performing stretches and folds will help with gluten development. Keep monitoring the dough, if it rises too fast, you can shorten the time between stretches to 40 minutes or less.
  • After the final stretch, you should see some bubbles on the surface. The dough should become lighter and bigger, with a rise of 50% to 100%. The exact rise depends on the strength of the flour you are using: with strong flour, the dough can proof up to 100% rise, while with weaker flour, up to 50%.

Note: All directions above are based on the dough temperature remaining between 24-26°C (75-79°F). If the temperature of the dough is higher or lower, please adjust the fermentation time accordingly. Higher temperatures will shorten the fermentation time, while lower temperatures will extend it.

Shaping sourdough 

  • 2.30 pm Dust the work surface with flour and flip the container with the dough onto it.
  • Starting with the side closest to you, pull the right two corners of the dough to the left, then fold them up into the center of the dough. Repeat this action with the other side.
  • Finally, roll the dough and shape it into a smooth, taut roll.
  • Transfer the roll, seam side up, to a prepared proofing basket or loaf pan lined with a kitchen towel.
  • Cover it with plastic wrap and let the dough rise in the refrigerator for 14-24 hours.

Baking

Next morning

  • Preheat your oven to 500°F and place a cast iron pan with the lid inside for 45 minutes to 1 hour.
  • Remove the dough from the fridge.
  • Flip it over onto a piece of parchment paper and score it with a sharp knife or a scoring lame.

  • Transfer the dough onto the hot cast iron pan and cover with the lid to create steam for a beautiful and crusty crumb.
  • Bake at 500°F for 15 minutes with the lid on.
  • Remove the lid and lower the temperature to 450°F.
  • Bake for 20 more minutes until golden brown.

Enjoy!

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Recipe Name
Quick Sourdough Bread
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16 thoughts on “Quick Sourdough Bread 

  1. Thanks for this post Natasha. I’ve been revisiting the classic recipes of Jeffrey Hamelman in his ultimate reference, “Bread”. His classic “Vermont Sourdough” is 45% starter – so you’re in very good company! In case anyone is wondering if such a large amount of starter results in a more “sour” flavour? My answer is no. Assuming you have a lovely fresh and lively starter, the shorter fermentation times lead to an amazing soft crumb with what I would call a “normal” and tasty flavour!

  2. Thanks for this post Natasha. I’ve been revisiting the classic recipes of Jeffrey Hamelman in his ultimate reference, “Bread”. His classic “Vermont Sourdough” is 45% starter – so you’re in very good company! In case anyone is wondering if such a large amount of starter results in a more “sour” flavour? My answer is no. Assuming you have a lovely fresh and lively starter, the shorter fermentation times lead to an amazing soft crumb with what I would call a “normal” and tasty flavour!

    1. Thank you Brad for sharing your insights on using a higher percentage of starter in bread recipes! It’s always interesting to hear about different approaches and experiences with sourdough baking. I loved this method so much just because it keeps the loaf less sour. Happy baking!

    2. Brad,
      i’m actually from Brattleboro, VT where Hamelmans used to exist! I was so lucky to have that VT sourdough as my childhood bread! i’m grown now, but i have such fond memories of that shop and its amazing smells.

  3. Hi ya,
    Do you have an easy to follow recipe for Sour Starter.
    Plz & thanks in advance.
    Joanne

  4. Hi, may i know how to open bake sourdough bread if doesn’t has dutch oven or hot cast oven pan .

    1. Hi!
      You can use pizza stone and tray under filled with hot boiling water instead of

  5. Hi Natasha. Thanks for your recipe. Should I but additional salt because of more starter? Consider the starter weight in calculating 2% salt?

    1. Hi!
      It’s all up to you.

  6. 50 % starter is a stiff starter, sounds confusing

    1. It means 50% of liquid starter from total amount of flour in the dough.

  7. Looks lile over two days … that is not my understanding of ‘quick’…

    1. Usually to make sourdough bread, takes 7-8 hours of warm fermentation and then cold fermentation and then baking.
      This method reduces the time of warm fermentation by half.

  8. Thanks for the recipe Natasha, it looks amazing. Will try it ASAP.

    1. Thank you so much ☺️

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